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AYESHA SERIES - Complete Collection: She (A History of Adventure) + Ayesha (The Return of She) + She & Allan + Wisdom's Daughter The Story about the Lost Kingdom in Africa Ruled by the Supernatural Ayesha or 'She-who-must-be-obeyed' von Haggard, Henry Rider (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 08.04.2016
  • Verlag: e-artnow
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AYESHA SERIES - Complete Collection: She (A History of Adventure) + Ayesha (The Return of She) + She & Allan + Wisdom's Daughter

This carefully crafted ebook: 'AYESHA SERIES - Complete Collection: She (A History of Adventure) + Ayesha (The Return of She) + She & Allan + Wisdom's Daughter' is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents: 'She' is one of the classics of imaginative literature, and one of the best-selling books of all time. She was extraordinarily popular upon its release and has never been out of print. The story is a first-person narrative that follows the journey of Horace Holly and his ward Leo Vincey to a lost kingdom in the African interior. There they encounter a primitive race of natives and a mysterious white queen named Ayesha who reigns as the all-powerful 'She', or 'She-who-must-be-obeyed'. In this work, Rider Haggard developed the conventions of the Lost World subgenre, which many later authors emulated. 'Ayesha, the Return of She' is a gothic-fantasy novel, a sequel to his far more popular and well known novel, She. 'She and Allan' is a novel, in which Haggard brought together his two most popular characters, Ayesha from She (to which it serves as a prequel), and Allan Quatermain from King Solomon's Mines. Wisdom's Daughter is the final book in the Ayesha series. Sir Henry Rider Haggard (1856-1925) was an English writer of adventure novels set in exotic locations, predominantly Africa, and a pioneer of the Lost World literary genre. His stories, situated at the lighter end of Victorian literature, continue to be popular and influential. His novels portray many of the stereotypes associated with colonialism, yet they are unusual for the degree of sympathy with which the native populations are portrayed.

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: watermark
    Seitenzahl: 1420
    Erscheinungsdatum: 08.04.2016
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9788026852339
    Verlag: e-artnow
    Größe: 1385 kBytes
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AYESHA SERIES - Complete Collection: She (A History of Adventure) + Ayesha (The Return of She) + She & Allan + Wisdom's Daughter

I
MY VISITOR

Table of Content
There are some events of which each circumstance and surrounding detail seems to be graven on the memory in such fashion that we cannot forget it, and so it is with the scene that I am about to describe. It rises as clearly before my mind at this moment as though it had happened but yesterday.

It was in this very month something over twenty years ago that I, Ludwig Horace Holly, was sitting one night in my rooms at Cambridge, grinding away at some mathematical work, I forget what. I was to go up for my fellowship within a week, and was expected by my tutor and my college generally to distinguish myself. At last, wearied out, I flung my book down, and, going to the mantelpiece, took down a pipe and filled it. There was a candle burning on the mantelpiece, and a long, narrow glass at the back of it; and as I was in the act of lighting the pipe I caught sight of my own countenance in the glass, and paused to reflect. The lighted match burnt away till it scorched my fingers, forcing me to drop it; but still I stood and stared at myself in the glass, and reflected.

"Well," I said aloud, at last, "it is to be hoped that I shall be able to do something with the inside of my head, for I shall certainly never do anything by the help of the outside."

This remark will doubtless strike anybody who reads it as being slightly obscure, but I was in reality alluding to my physical deficiencies. Most men of twenty-two are endowed at any rate with some share of the comeliness of youth, but to me even this was denied. Short, thick-set, and deep-chested almost to deformity, with long sinewy arms, heavy features, deep-set grey eyes, a low brow half overgrown with a mop of thick black hair, like a deserted clearing on which the forest had once more begun to encroach; such was my appearance nearly a quarter of a century ago, and such, with some modification, it is to this day. Like Cain, I was branded-branded by Nature with the stamp of abnormal ugliness, as I was gifted by Nature with iron and abnormal strength and considerable intellectual powers. So ugly was I that the spruce young men of my College, though they were proud enough of my feats of endurance and physical prowess, did not even care to be seen walking with me. Was it wonderful that I was misanthropic and sullen? Was it wonderful that I brooded and worked alone, and had no friends-at least, only one? I was set apart by Nature to live alone, and draw comfort from her breast, and hers only. Women hated the sight of me. Only a week before I had heard one call me a "monster" when she thought I was out of hearing, and say that I had converted her to the monkey theory. Once, indeed, a woman pretended to care for me, and I lavished all the pent-up affection of my nature upon her. Then money that was to have come to me went elsewhere, and she discarded me. I pleaded with her as I have never pleaded with any living creature before or since, for I was caught by her sweet face, and loved her; and in the end by way of answer she took me to the glass, and stood side by side with me, and looked into it.

"Now," she said, "if I am Beauty, who are you?" That was when I was only twenty.

And so I stood and stared, and felt a sort of grim satisfaction in the sense of my own loneliness; for I had neither father, nor mother, nor brother; and as I did so there came a knock at my door.

I listened before I went to open it, for it was nearly twelve o'clock at night, and I was in no mood to admit any stranger. I had but one friend in the College, or, indeed, in the world-perhaps it was he.

Just then the person outside the door coughed, and I hastened to open it, for I knew the cough.

A tall man of about thirty, with the remains of great personal beauty, came hurrying in, staggering beneath the weight of a massive iron box which he carried by a handle with his right hand. He placed the

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