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The Complete Works of John Buchan (Unabridged) Thriller Classics, Spy Novels, Supernatural Tales, Short Stories, Poetry, Historical Works, The Great War Writings, Essays, Biographies & Memoirs - All in One Volume von Buchan, John (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 25.03.2016
  • Verlag: e-artnow
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The Complete Works of John Buchan (Unabridged)

This carefully crafted ebook: 'The Complete Works of John Buchan (Unabridged)' is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents: Richard Hannay Series The Thirty-Nine Steps Greenmantle Mr Standfast The Three Hostages The Island of Sheep Dickson McCunn and the 'Gorbals Die-hards' Series Huntingtower Castle Gay The House of the Four Winds Sir Edward Leithen Series The Power-House John Macnab The Dancing Floor The Gap in the Curtain Sick Heart River Other Novels Sir Quixote of the Moors John Burnet of Barns A Lost Lady of Old Years The Half-Hearted A Lodge in the Wilderness Prester John Salute to Adventurers The Path of the King Midwinter Witch Wood The Blanket of the Dark A Prince of the Captivity The Free Fishers The Magic Walking Stick The Courts of the Morning Short Stories Grey Weather The Moon Endureth: Tales The Far Islands Fountainblue The King of Ypres The Keeper of Cademuir No-Man's-Land Basilissa The Runagates Club... Poetry The Pilgrim Fathers Ballad for Grey Weather The Moon Endureth: Fancies Poems, Scots and English... Historical & Political Works: The African Colony: Studies in the Reconstruction Days to Remember: The British Empire in the Great War The Battle of Jutland The Battle of the Somme, First Phase The Battle of the Somme, Second Phase Nelson's History of the War (Volumes I-V) Scholar Gipsies A Book of Escapes and Hurried Journeys Montrose: A History Lord Minto, A Memoir Sir Walter Scott The King's Grace 1910-1935 Autobiography & Biography Memory Hold-the-door Unforgettable, Unforgotten by A. M. Buchan John Buchan (1875-1940) was a Scottish novelist and historian and also served as Canada's Governor General. His works include novels, collections of short stories, historiographical works and biographies. But, the most famous of his books were the adventure and spy thrillers, most notably The Thirty-Nine Steps, and it is for these that he is now best remembered.

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: watermark
    Seitenzahl: 1150
    Erscheinungsdatum: 25.03.2016
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9788026851486
    Verlag: e-artnow
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The Complete Works of John Buchan (Unabridged)

CHAPTER 2
THE MILKMAN SETS OUT ON HIS TRAVELS

Table of Contents

I sat down in an armchair and felt very sick. That lasted for maybe five minutes, and was succeeded by a fit of the horrors. The poor staring white face on the floor was more than I could bear, and I managed to get a table-cloth and cover it. Then I staggered to a cupboard, found the brandy and swallowed several mouthfuls. I had seen men die violently before; indeed I had killed a few myself in the Matabele War; but this cold-blooded indoor business was different. Still I managed to pull myself together. I looked at my watch, and saw that it was half-past ten.

An idea seized me, and I went over the flat with a small-tooth comb. There was nobody there, nor any trace of anybody, but I shuttered and bolted all the windows and put the chain on the door. By this time my wits were coming back to me, and I could think again. It took me about an hour to figure the thing out, and I did not hurry, for, unless the murderer came back, I had till about six o'clock in the morning for my cogitations.

I was in the soup-that was pretty clear. Any shadow of a doubt I might have had about the truth of Scudder's tale was now gone. The proof of it was lying under the table-cloth. The men who knew that he knew what he knew had found him, and had taken the best way to make certain of his silence. Yes; but he had been in my rooms four days, and his enemies must have reckoned that he had confided in me. So I would be the next to go. It might be that very night, or next day, or the day after, but my number was up all right. Then suddenly I thought of another probability. Supposing I went out now and called in the police, or went to bed and let Paddock find the body and call them in the morning. What kind of a story was I to tell about Scudder? I had lied to Paddock about him, and the whole thing looked desperately fishy. If I made a clean breast of it and told the police everything he had told me, they would simply laugh at me. The odds were a thousand to one that I would be charged with the murder, and the circumstantial evidence was strong enough to hang me. Few people knew me in England; I had no real pal who could come forward and swear to my character. Perhaps that was what those secret enemies were playing for. They were clever enough for anything, and an English prison was as good a way of getting rid of me till after June 15th as a knife in my chest.

Besides, if I told the whole story, and by any miracle was believed, I would be playing their game. Karolides would stay at home, which was what they wanted. Somehow or other the sight of Scudder's dead face had made me a passionate believer in his scheme. He was gone, but he had taken me into his confidence, and I was pretty well bound to carry on his work.

You may think this ridiculous for a man in danger of his life, but that was the way I looked at it. I am an ordinary sort of fellow, not braver than other people, but I hate to see a good man downed, and that long knife would not be the end of Scudder if I could play the game in his place.

It took me an hour or two to think this out, and by that time I had come to a decision. I must vanish somehow, and keep vanished till the end of the second week in June. Then I must somehow find a way to get in touch with the Government people and tell them what Scudder had told me. I wished to Heaven he had told me more, and that I had listened more carefully to the little he had told me. I knew nothing but the barest facts. There was a big risk that, even if I weathered the other dangers, I would not be believed in the end. I must take my chance of that, and hope that something might happen which would confirm my tale in the eyes of the Government.

My first job was to keep going for the next three weeks. It was now the 24th day of May, and that meant twenty days of hiding before I could venture to approach

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