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The Princess Casamassima (The Unabridged Edition) A Political Thriller from the famous author of the realism movement, known for Portrait of a Lady, The Ambassadors, The Bostonians, The Turn of The Screw, The Wings of the Dove, The American... von James, Henry (eBook)

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The Princess Casamassima (The Unabridged Edition)

This carefully crafted ebook: 'The Princess Casamassima (The Unabridged Edition)' is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. The Princess Casamassima is the story of an intelligent but confused young London bookbinder, Hyacinth Robinson, who becomes involved in radical politics and a terrorist assassination plot. Amanda Pynsent, an impoverished seamstress, has adopted Hyacinth Robinson, the illegitimate son of her old friend Florentine Vivier, a Frenchwoman of less than sterling repute, and an English lord. Florentine had stabbed her lover to death several years ago, and Pinnie (as Miss Pynsent is nicknamed) takes Hyacinth to see her as she lies dying at Millbank prison. Hyacinth eventually learns that the dying woman is his mother and that she murdered his father. Many years pass. Hyacinth, now a young man and a skilled bookbinder, meets revolutionary Paul Muniment and gets involved in radical politics. Hyacinth also has a coarse but lively girlfriend, Millicent Henning, and one night they go to the theatre. There Hyacinth meets the radiantly beautiful Princess Casamassima... Henry James (1843-1916) was an American-British writer who spent most of his writing career in Britain. He is regarded as one of the key figures of 19th-century literary realism. This carefully crafted ebook: 'The Princess Casamassima (The Unabridged Edition)' is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents.

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: watermark
    Seitenzahl: 446
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9788026836575
    Verlag: e-artnow
    Größe: 1503 kBytes
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The Princess Casamassima (The Unabridged Edition)

Chapter VIII
Table of Contents
PAUL MUNIMENT took a match out of his pocket and lighted it on the sole of his shoe; after which he applied it to a tallow candle which stood in a tin receptacle on the low mantel - shelf. This enabled Hyacinth to perceive a narrow bed in a corner, and a small figure stretched upon it - a figure revealed to him mainly by the bright fixedness of a pair of large eyes, of which the whites were sharply contrasted with the dark pupil, and which gazed at him across a counterpane of gaudy patchwork. The brown room seemed crowded with heterogeneous objects, and had, moreover, for Hyacinth, thanks to a multitude of small prints, both plain and colored, fastened all over the walls, a highly decorated appearance. The little person in the corner had the air of having gone to bed in a picture-gallery, and as soon as Hyacinth became aware of this his impression deepened that Paul Muniment and his sister were very remarkable people. Lady Aurora hovered before him with a kind of drooping erectness, laughing a good deal, vaguely and shyly, as if there were something rather awkward in her being found still on the premises. "Rosy, girl, I've brought you a visitor," Paul Muniment said. "This young man has walked all the way from Lisson Grove to make your acquaintance." Rosy continued to look at Hyacinth from over her counterpane, and he felt slightly embarrassed, for he had never yet been presented to a young lady in her position. "You mustn't mind her being in bed - she's always in bed," her brother went on. "She's in bed just the same as a little trout is in the water."

"Dear me, if I didn't receive company because I was in bed, there wouldn't be much use, would there, Lady Aurora?"

Rosy made this inquiry in a light, gay tone, darting her brilliant eyes at her companion, who replied, instantly, with still greater hilarity, and in a voice which struck Hyacinth as strange and affected, "Oh, dear, no, it seems quite the natural place!" Then she added, "And it's such a pretty bed, such a comfortable bed!"

"Indeed it is, when your-ladyship makes it up," said Rosy; while Hyacinth wondered at this strange phenomenon of a peer's daughter (for he knew she must be that) performing the functions of a housemaid.

"I say, now, you haven't been doing that again to-day?" Muniment asked, punching the mattress of the invalid with a vigorous hand.

"Pray, who would, if I didn'?" Lady Aurora inquired. "It only takes a minute, if one knows how." Her manner was jocosely apologetic, and she seemed to plead guilty to having been absurd; in the dim light Hyacinth thought he saw her blush, as if she were much embarrassed. In spite of her blushing, her appearance and man-ner suggested to him a personage in a comedy. She sounded the letter r peculiarly.

"I can do it, beautifully. I often do it, when Mrs. Major doesn' come up," Paul Muniment said, continuing to thump his sister's couch in an appreciative but somewhat subversive manner.

"Oh, I have no doubt whatever!" Lady Aurora exclaimed, quickly. "Mrs. Major must have so very much to do."

"Not in the making-up of beds, I'm afraid; there are only two or three, down there, for so many," Paul Muniment remarked, loudly, and with a kind of incongruous cheerfulness.

"Yes, I have thought a great deal about that. But there wouldn' be room for more, you know," said Lady Aurora, this time in a very serious tone. "There's not much room for a family of that sort anywhere - thirteen people, of all ages and sizes," the young man rejoined. "The world 's pretty big, but there doesn' seem room."

"We are also thirteen at home;" said Lady Aurora, laughing again. "We are also rather crowded."

"Surely you don' mean at Inglefield?" Rosy inquired, eagerly, in her dusky nook.

"I don' know about Inglefield. I am so much in town." Hyacinth could see that Inglefield was a subject she wished to turn o

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