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ALLAN QUATERMAIN - Complete Series: 18 Adventure Books in One Volume All the Original Books Featuring the Adventurer Who Was a Template for the Character Indiana Jones: King Solomon's Mines, Maiwa's Revenge, Allan and the Holy Flower, Child of Storm... von Haggard, Henry Rider (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 25.04.2016
  • Verlag: e-artnow
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ALLAN QUATERMAIN - Complete Series: 18 Adventure Books in One Volume

This carefully crafted ebook: 'ALLAN QUATERMAIN - Complete Series: 18 Adventure Books in One Volume' is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Allan Quatermain - The reluctant hero, ultimate adventurer and outdoorsman, was a template for the American character Indiana Jones, featured in the films Raiders of the Lost Ark, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, and Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. Quatermain also became a main character in the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. In this collection of the original books, Allan Quatermain is the hero of the Lost World Classic, King Solomon's Mines, and its various prequels and sequels. Table of Contents: Marie Allan's Wife Child of Storm A Tale of Three Lions Maiwa's Revenge The Hunter Quatermain's Story Long Odds Allan and the Holy Flower She and Allan The Ivory Child Finished Magepa the Buck King Solomon's Mines The Ancient Allan Allan Quatermain

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: watermark
    Seitenzahl: 205
    Erscheinungsdatum: 25.04.2016
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9788026853299
    Verlag: e-artnow
    Größe: 3413 kBytes
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ALLAN QUATERMAIN - Complete Series: 18 Adventure Books in One Volume

CHAPTER II.
THE ATTACK ON MARAISFONTEIN

Table of Content
I do not propose to set out the history of the years which I spent in acquiring a knowledge of French and various other subjects, under the tuition of the learned but prejudiced Monsieur Leblanc. Indeed, there is "none to tell, sir." When Monsieur Leblanc was sober, he was a most excellent and well-informed tutor, although one apt to digress into many side issues, which in themselves were not uninstructive. When tipsy, he grew excited and harangued us, generally upon politics and religion, or rather its reverse, for he was an advanced freethinker, although this was a side to his character which, however intoxicated he might be, he always managed to conceal from the Heer Marais. I may add that a certain childish code of honour prevented us from betraying his views on this and sundry other matters. When absolutely drunk, which, on an average, was not more than once a month, he simply slept, and we did what we pleased-a fact which our childish code of honour also prevented us from betraying.

But, on the whole, we got on very well together, for, after the incident of our first meeting, Monsieur Leblanc was always polite to me. Marie he adored, as did every one about the place, from her father down to the meanest slave. Need I add that I adored her more than all of them put together, first with the love that some children have for each other, and afterwards, as we became adult, with that wider love by which it is at once transcended and made complete. Strange would it have been if this were not so, seeing that we spent nearly half of every week practically alone together, and that, from the first, Marie, whose nature was as open as the clear noon, never concealed her affection for me. True, it was a very discreet affection, almost sisterly, or even motherly, in its outward and visible aspects, as though she could never forget that extra half-inch of height or month or two of age.

Moreover, from a child she was a woman, as an Irishman might say, for circumstances and character had shaped her thus. Not much more than a year before we met, her mother, whose only child she was, and whom she loved with all her strong and passionate heart, died after a lingering illness, leaving her in charge of her father and his house. I think it was this heavy bereavement in early youth which coloured her nature with a grey tinge of sadness and made her seem so much older than her years.

So the time went on, I worshipping Marie in my secret thought, but saying nothing about it, and Marie talking of and acting towards me as though I were her dear younger brother. Nobody, not even her father or mine, or Monsieur Leblanc, took the slightest notice of this queer relationship, or seemed to dream that it might lead to ultimate complications which, in fact, would have been very distasteful to them all for reasons that I will explain.

Needless to say, in due course, as they were bound to do, those complications arose, and under pressure of great physical and moral excitement the truth came out. It happened thus.

Every reader of the history of the Cape Colony has heard of the great Kaffir War of 1835. That war took place for the most part in the districts of Albany and Somerset, so that we inhabitants of Cradock, on the whole, suffered little. Therefore, with the natural optimism and carelessness of danger of dwellers in wild places, we began to think ourselves fairly safe from attack. Indeed, so we should have been, had it not been for a foolish action on the part of Monsieur Leblanc.

It seems that on a certain Sunday, a day that I always spent at home with my father, Monsieur Leblanc rode out alone to some hills about five miles distant from Maraisfontein. He had often been cautioned that this was an unsafe thing to do, but the truth is that the foolish man thought he had found a rich copper mine in these hills, and w

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