text.skipToContent text.skipToNavigation
background-image

BRITISH MYSTERIES COLLECTION - 27 Novels in One Volume: Complete Dr. Thorndyke Series, A Savant's Vendetta, The Exploits of Danby Croker, The Golden Pool, The Unwilling Adventurer and many more The Red Thumb Mark, The Eye of Osiris, The Mystery of 31 New Inn, A Silent Witness, The Cat's Eye, The Shadow of the Wolf, As a Thief in the Night, When Rogues Fall Out, The Penrose Mystery and more von Freeman, R. Austin (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 23.03.2016
  • Verlag: e-artnow
eBook (ePUB)
0,49 €
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
Sofort per Download lieferbar

Online verfügbar

BRITISH MYSTERIES COLLECTION - 27 Novels in One Volume: Complete Dr. Thorndyke Series, A Savant's Vendetta, The Exploits of Danby Croker, The Golden Pool, The Unwilling Adventurer and many more

This carefully crafted ebook: 'BRITISH MYSTERIES COLLECTION - 27 Novels in One Volume: Complete Dr. Thorndyke Series, A Savant's Vendetta, The Exploits of Danby Croker, The Golden Pool, The Unwilling Adventurer and many more' is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Richard Austin Freeman (1862-1943) was a British writer of detective stories, mostly featuring the forensic investigator Dr. Thorndyke. He introduced the inverted detective story; a crime fiction in which the commission of the crime is described at the beginning, usually including the identity of the perpetrator, with the story then describing the detective's attempt to solve the mystery. Many of the Dr. Thorndyke stories involve genuine, but often quite arcane, points of scientific knowledge, from areas such as tropical medicine and toxicology. Table of Contents: Dr. Thorndyke Novels The Red Thumb Mark The Eye of Osiris (The Vanishing Man) The Mystery of 31 New Inn A Silent Witness Helen Vardon's Confession The Cat's Eye The Mystery of Angelina Frood The Shadow of the Wolf The D'Arblay Mystery A Certain Dr. Thorndyke As a Thief in the Night Mr. Pottermack's Oversight Pontifex, Son and Thorndyke When Rogues Fall Out (Dr. Thorndyke's Discovery) Dr. Thorndyke Intervenes For the Defence: Dr. Thorndyke The Penrose Mystery Felo De Se? (Death at the Inn) The Stoneware Monkey Mr. Polton Explains The Jacob Street Mystery (The Unconscious Witness) Other Novels The Golden Pool: A Story of a Forgotten Mine The Unwilling Adventurer The Uttermost Farthing (A Savant's Vendetta) The Exploits of Danby Croker The Surprising Experiences of Mr. Shuttlebury Cobb Flighty Phyllis

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: watermark
    Seitenzahl: 770
    Erscheinungsdatum: 23.03.2016
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9788026852551
    Verlag: e-artnow
    Größe: 6078kBytes
Weiterlesen weniger lesen

BRITISH MYSTERIES COLLECTION - 27 Novels in One Volume: Complete Dr. Thorndyke Series, A Savant's Vendetta, The Exploits of Danby Croker, The Golden Pool, The Unwilling Adventurer and many more

Confidences
Table of Contents
During our walk home my friend was unusually thoughtful and silent, and his face bore a look of concentration under which I thought I could detect, in spite of his habitually impassive expression, a certain suppressed excitement of a not entirely unpleasurable kind. I forbore, however, from making any remarks or asking questions, not only because I saw that he was preoccupied, but also because, from my knowledge of the man, I judged that he would consider it his duty to keep his own counsel and to make no unnecessary confidences even to me.

On our arrival at his chambers he immediately handed over the camera to Polton with a few curt directions as to the development of the plates, and, lunch being already prepared, we sat down at the table without delay.

We had proceeded with our meal in silence for some time when Thorndyke suddenly laid down his knife and fork and looked into my face with a smile of quiet amusement.

"It has just been borne in upon me, Jervis," said he, "that you are the most companionable fellow in the world. You have the heaven-sent gift of silence."

"If silence is the test of companionability," I answered, with a grin, "I think I can pay you a similar compliment in even more emphatic terms."

He laughed cheerfully and rejoined-

"You are pleased to be sarcastic, I observe; but I maintain my position. The capacity to preserve an opportune silence is the rarest and most precious of social accomplishments. Now, most men would have plied me with questions and babbled comments on my proceedings at Scotland Yard, whereas you have allowed me to sort out, without interruption, a mass of evidence while it is still fresh and impressive, to docket each item and stow it away in the pigeonholes of my brain. By the way, I have made a ridiculous oversight."

"What is that?" I asked.

"The 'Thumbograph.' I never ascertained whether the police have it or whether it is still in the possession of Mrs. Hornby."

"Does it matter?" I inquired.

"Not much; only I must see it. And perhaps it will furnish an excellent pretext for you to call on Miss Gibson. As I am busy at the hospital this afternoon and Polton has his hands full, it would be a good plan for you to drop in at Endsley Gardens-that is the address, I think-and if you can see Miss Gibson, try to get a confidential chat with her, and extend your knowledge of the manners and customs of the three Messieurs Hornby. Put on your best bedside manner and keep your weather eye lifting. Find out everything you can as to the characters and habits of those three gentlemen, regardless of all scruples of delicacy. Everything is of importance to us, even to the names of their tailors."

"And with regard to the 'Thumbograph'?"

"Find out who has it, and, if it is still in Mrs. Hornby's possession, get her to lend it to us or-what might, perhaps, be better-get her permission to take a photograph of it."

"It shall be done according to your word," said I. "I will furbish up my exterior, and this very afternoon make my first appearance in the character of Paul Pry."

About an hour later I found myself upon the doorstep of Mr. Hornby's house in Endsley Gardens listening to the jangling of the bell that I had just set in motion.

"Miss Gibson, sir?" repeated the parlourmaid in response to my question. "She was going out, but I am not sure whether she has gone yet. If you will step in, I will go and see."

I followed her into the drawing-room, and, threading my way amongst the litter of small tables and miscellaneous furniture by which ladies nowadays convert their special domain into the semblance of a broker's shop, let go my anchor in the vicinity of the fireplace to await the parlourmaid's report.

I had not long to wait, for in less than a minute Miss Gibson herself entered the room. She wore her hat and glove

Weiterlesen weniger lesen

Kundenbewertungen