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Captain Singleton von Defoe, Daniel (eBook)

  • Verlag: Seltzer Books
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Captain Singleton

The Preface begins: 'That all Defoe's novels, with the exception of 'Robinson Crusoe,' should have been covered with the dust of neglect for many generations, is a plain proof of how much fashions in taste affect the popularity of the British classics. It is true that three generations or so ago, Defoe's works were edited by both Sir Walter Scott and Hazlitt, and that this masterly piece of realism, 'Captain Singleton,' was reprinted a few years back in 'The Camelot Classics,' but it is safe to say that out of every thousand readers of 'Robinson Crusoe' only one or two will have even heard of the 'Memoirs of a Cavalier,' 'Colonel Jack,' 'Moll Flanders,' or 'Captain Singleton.' It is indeed distressing to think that while many scores of thousands of copies of Lord Lytton's flashy romance, 'Paul Clifford,' have been devoured by the public, 'Captain Singleton' has remained unread and almost forgotten.' According to Wikipedia: Daniel Defoe (1659/1661 [?] - 1731), born Daniel Foe, was an English writer, journalist, and pamphleteer, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. Defoe is notable for being one of the earliest practitioners of the novel, as he helped to popularise the form in Britain, and is even referred to by some as one of the founders of the English novel. A prolific and versatile writer, he wrote more than five hundred books, pamphlets, and journals on various topics (including politics, crime, religion, marriage, psychology and the supernatural). He was also a pioneer of economic journalism.'

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: AdobeDRM
    Seitenzahl: 775
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9781455390311
    Verlag: Seltzer Books
    Größe: 775 kBytes
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Captain Singleton

THE LIFE, ADVENTURES AND PIRACIES OF THE FAMOUS CAPTAIN SINGLETON BY DANIEL DEFOE

published by Samizdat Express, Orange, CT, USA

established in 1974, offering over 14,000 books

Works by Daniel Defoe:

The Life Adventures and Piracies of the Famous Captain Singleton
The Complete English Tradesman
The Consolidator: or, Memoirs of Sundry Transactions From the World in the Moon.
An Essay Upon Projects
The Fortunate Mistress of a History of the Life of Mademoiselle Beleau, Known by the Name of Lady Roxana
From London to Land's End
The Further Adventures of Robinson Crusoe
The History of the Devil, as Well Ancient as Modern
History of the Plague in London
A Journal of the Plague Year
Memoirs of a Cavalier or a Military Journal of the Wars in Germany and the Wars in England from the Year 1632 to the Year 1648
The Military Memoirs of Captain George Carleton from the Dutch War 1672 in which He Served, to the Conclusion of the Peace at Utrecht 1713
The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders
Robinson Crusoe
Tour Through the Eastern Counties of England, 1722

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PREFACE

LIST OF DEFOE'S WORK

THE LIFE, ADVENTURES, AND PIRACIES OF CAPTAIN SINGLETON

PREFACE

That all Defoe's novels, with the exception of "Robinson Crusoe," should have been covered with the dust of neglect for many generations, is a plain proof of how much fashions in taste affect the popularity of the British classics. It is true that three generations or so ago, Defoe's works were edited by both Sir Walter Scott and Hazlitt, and that this masterly piece of realism, "Captain Singleton," was reprinted a few years back in "The Camelot Classics," but it is safe to say that out of every thousand readers of "Robinson Crusoe" only one or two will have even heard of the "Memoirs of a Cavalier," "Colonel Jack," "Moll Flanders," or "Captain Singleton." It is indeed distressing to think that while many scores of thousands of copies of Lord Lytton's flashy romance, "Paul Clifford," have been devoured by the public, "Captain Singleton" has remained unread and almost forgotten. But the explanation is simple. Defoe's plain and homely realism soon grew to be thought vulgar by people who themselves aspired to be refined and genteel. The rapid spread of popular education, in the middle of last century, was responsible for a great many aberrations of taste, and the works of the two most English of Englishmen, Defoe and Hogarth, were judged to be hardly fitting for polite society, as we may see from Lamb's Essay on Hogarth, and from an early edition of Chambers's "Cyclopaedia of English Literature" (1843), where we are told: "Nor is it needful to show how elegant and reflective literature, especially, tends to moralise, to soften, and to adorn the soul and life of man." "Unfortunately the taste or circumstances of Defoe led him mostly into low life, and his characters are such as we cannot sympathise with. The whole arcana of roguery and villany seems to have been open to him.... It might be thought that the good taste which led Defoe to write in a style of such pure and unpretending English, instead of the inflated manner of vulgar writers, would have dictated a more careful select

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