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RICHARD HANNAY Complete Collection - 7 Mystery & Espionage Books in One Volume (Unabridged) The Thirty-Nine Steps, Greenmantle, Mr Standfast, The Three Hostages, The Island of Sheep, The Courts of the Morning & The Green Wildebeest von Buchan, John (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 25.03.2016
  • Verlag: e-artnow
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RICHARD HANNAY Complete Collection - 7 Mystery & Espionage Books in One Volume (Unabridged)

This carefully crafted ebook: 'RICHARD HANNAY Complete Collection - 7 Mystery & Espionage Books in One Volume (Unabridged)' is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Major-General Sir Richard Hannay is a character created by Scottish novelist John Buchan. Hannay is based on Edmund Ironside, from Edinburgh, a spy during the Second Boer War. The Thirty-Nine Steps - Hannay is buttonholed by an American stranger who knows of an anarchist plot to assassinate the Greek Premier during his forthcoming visit to London. It is now up to Hannay to save the day and stop Europe from destabilising. Greenmantle - Hannay is called in to investigate rumours of an uprising in Constantinople. Once there, he and his friends must thwart the Germans' plans to use religion in winning the war. Mr Standfast - Brigadier-General Hannay is recalled from active service on the Western Front to undertake a secret undercover mission hunting for a dangerous German agent at large in Britain. The Three Hostages - Hannay receives a request to help solve the mysterious kidnapping of the children of three prominent people before it's too late... The Island of Sheep - Hannay, now in his fifties, is called by an old oath to protect the son of a man he once knew, who is also heir to the secret of a great treasure. The Courts of the Morning - Hannay is approached by the American military attache in London to covertly solve the mystery of Blenkiron's disappearance in South America. Hannay seeks out his friend Sandy Arbuthnot for help, but Sandy soon disappears, sending Hannay a mysterious letter . . . The Green Wildebeest - It is a mystery tale of a man afflicted with a terrible curse for doing something he shouldn't have John Buchan (1875-1940) was a Scottish novelist and historian and also served as Canada's Governor General. He is now best remembered for his adventure and spy thrillers, most notably The Thirty-Nine Steps.

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    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: watermark
    Seitenzahl: 990
    Erscheinungsdatum: 25.03.2016
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9788026851509
    Verlag: e-artnow
    Größe: 2818 kBytes
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RICHARD HANNAY Complete Collection - 7 Mystery & Espionage Books in One Volume (Unabridged)

CHAPTER 2
THE MILKMAN SETS OUT ON HIS TRAVELS

Table of Contents

I sat down in an armchair and felt very sick. That lasted for maybe five minutes, and was succeeded by a fit of the horrors. The poor staring white face on the floor was more than I could bear, and I managed to get a table-cloth and cover it. Then I staggered to a cupboard, found the brandy and swallowed several mouthfuls. I had seen men die violently before; indeed I had killed a few myself in the Matabele War; but this cold-blooded indoor business was different. Still I managed to pull myself together. I looked at my watch, and saw that it was half-past ten.

An idea seized me, and I went over the flat with a small-tooth comb. There was nobody there, nor any trace of anybody, but I shuttered and bolted all the windows and put the chain on the door. By this time my wits were coming back to me, and I could think again. It took me about an hour to figure the thing out, and I did not hurry, for, unless the murderer came back, I had till about six o'clock in the morning for my cogitations.

I was in the soup-that was pretty clear. Any shadow of a doubt I might have had about the truth of Scudder's tale was now gone. The proof of it was lying under the table-cloth. The men who knew that he knew what he knew had found him, and had taken the best way to make certain of his silence. Yes; but he had been in my rooms four days, and his enemies must have reckoned that he had confided in me. So I would be the next to go. It might be that very night, or next day, or the day after, but my number was up all right. Then suddenly I thought of another probability. Supposing I went out now and called in the police, or went to bed and let Paddock find the body and call them in the morning. What kind of a story was I to tell about Scudder? I had lied to Paddock about him, and the whole thing looked desperately fishy. If I made a clean breast of it and told the police everything he had told me, they would simply laugh at me. The odds were a thousand to one that I would be charged with the murder, and the circumstantial evidence was strong enough to hang me. Few people knew me in England; I had no real pal who could come forward and swear to my character. Perhaps that was what those secret enemies were playing for. They were clever enough for anything, and an English prison was as good a way of getting rid of me till after June 15th as a knife in my chest.

Besides, if I told the whole story, and by any miracle was believed, I would be playing their game. Karolides would stay at home, which was what they wanted. Somehow or other the sight of Scudder's dead face had made me a passionate believer in his scheme. He was gone, but he had taken me into his confidence, and I was pretty well bound to carry on his work.

You may think this ridiculous for a man in danger of his life, but that was the way I looked at it. I am an ordinary sort of fellow, not braver than other people, but I hate to see a good man downed, and that long knife would not be the end of Scudder if I could play the game in his place.

It took me an hour or two to think this out, and by that time I had come to a decision. I must vanish somehow, and keep vanished till the end of the second week in June. Then I must somehow find a way to get in touch with the Government people and tell them what Scudder had told me. I wished to Heaven he had told me more, and that I had listened more carefully to the little he had told me. I knew nothing but the barest facts. There was a big risk that, even if I weathered the other dangers, I would not be believed in the end. I must take my chance of that, and hope that something might happen which would confirm my tale in the eyes of the Government.

My first job was to keep going for the next three weeks. It was now the 24th day of May, and that meant twenty days of hiding before I could venture to approach

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