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The Children of Odin: The Book of Northern Myths von Colum, Padraic (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 16.08.2016
  • Verlag: anboco
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The Children of Odin: The Book of Northern Myths

Far Away and Long Ago The Building of the Wall Iduna and Her Apples: How Loki Put the Gods in Danger Sif's Golden Hair: How Loki Wrought Mischief in Asgard How Brock Brought Judgment on Loki How Freya Gained Her Necklace and How Her Loved One Was Lost to Her How Frey Won Gerda, the Giant Maiden, and How He Lost His Magic Sword Heimdall and Little Hnossa: How All Things Came to Be The All-Father's Forebodings: How He Leaves Asgard Odin Goes to Mimir's Well: His Sacrifice for Wisdom Odin Faces an Evil Man Odin Wins for Men the Magic Mead Odin Tells to Vidar, His Silent Son, the Secret of His Doings Thor and Loki in the Giants' City How Thor and Loki Befooled Thrym the Giant Ægir's Feast: How Thor Triumphed The Dwarf's Hoard, and the Curse that It Brought Foreboding in Asgard Loki the Betrayer Loki Against the Æsir The Valkyrie The Children of Loki Baldur's Doom Loki's Punishment Sigurd's Youth The Sword Gram and the Dragon Fafnir The Dragon's Blood The Story of Sigmund and Signy The Story of Sigmund and Sinfiotli The Story of the Vengeance of the Volsungs and of the Death of Sinfiotli Brynhild in the House of Flame Sigurd at the House of the Nibelungs How Brynhild Was Won for Gunnar The Death of Sigurd The Twilight of the Gods

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: watermark
    Seitenzahl: 500
    Erscheinungsdatum: 16.08.2016
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9783736407497
    Verlag: anboco
    Größe: 2619 kBytes
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The Children of Odin: The Book of Northern Myths

HOW BROCK BROUGHT JUDGMENT ON LOKI

It was then that Loki, with the wish of making the Æsir and the Vanir friendly to him once more, brought out the wonderful things he had gained from the Dwarfs-the spear Gungnir and the boat Skidbladnir. The Æsir and the Vanir marveled at things so wonderful. Loki gave the spear as a gift to Odin, and to Frey, who was chief of the Vanir, he gave the boat Skidbladnir.

All Asgard rejoiced that things so wonderful and so helpful had been brought to them. And Loki, who had made a great show in giving these gifts, said boastingly:

"None but the Dwarfs who work for me could make such things. There are other Dwarfs, but they are as unhandy as they are misshapen. The Dwarfs who are my servants are the only ones who can make such wonders."

Now Loki in his boastfulness had said a foolish thing. There were other Dwarfs besides those who had worked for him, and one of these was there in Asgard. All unknown to Loki he stood in the shadow of Odin's seat, listening to what was being said. Now he went over to Loki, his little, unshapely form trembling with rage-Brock, the most spiteful of all the Dwarfs.

"Ha, Loki, you boaster," he roared, "you lie in your words. Sindri, my brother, who would scorn to serve you, is the best smith in Svartheim."

The Æsir and the Vanir laughed to see Loki outfaced by Brock the Dwarf in the middle of his boastfulness. As they laughed Loki grew angry.

"Be silent, Dwarf," he said, "your brother will know about smith's work when he goes to the Dwarfs who are my friends, and learns something from them."

"He learn from the Dwarfs who are your friends! My brother Sindri learn from the Dwarfs who are your friends!" Brock roared, in a greater rage than before. "The things you have brought out of Svartheim would not be noticed by the Æsir and the Vanir if they were put beside the things that my brother Sindri can make."

"Sometime we will try your brother Sindri and see what he can do," said Loki.

"Try now, try now," Brock shouted. "I'll wager my head against yours, Loki, that his work will make the Dwellers in Asgard laugh at your boasting."

"I will take your wager," said Loki. "My head against yours. And glad will I be to see that ugly head of yours off your misshapen shoulders."

"The Æsir will judge whether my brother's work is not the best that ever came out of Svartheim. And they will see to it that you will pay your wager, Loki, the head off your shoulders. Will ye not sit in judgment, O Dwellers in Asgard?"

"We will sit in judgment," said the Æsir. Then, still full of rage, Brock the Dwarf went down to Svartheim, and to the place where his brother Sindri worked.

There was Sindri in his glowing forge, working with bellows and anvil and hammers beside him, and around him masses of metal-gold and silver, copper and iron. Brock told his tale, how he had wagered his head against Loki's that Sindri could make things more wonderful than the spear and the boat that Loki had brought into Asgard.

"You were right in what you said, my brother," said Sindri, "and you shall not lose your head to Loki. But the two of us must work at what I am going to forge. It will be your work to keep the fire so that it will neither blaze up nor die down for a single instant. If you can keep the fire as I tell you, we will forge a wonder. Now, brother, keep your hands upon the bellows, and keep the fire under your control."

Then into the fire Sindri threw, not a piece of metal, but a pig's skin. Brock kept his hands on the bellows, working it so that the fire neither died down nor blazed up for a single instant. And in the glowing fire the pigskin swelled itself into a strange shape.

But Brock was not left to work the bellows in peace. In to the forge flew a gadfly. It lighted on Brock's hands and stung them. The Dwarf screamed with pain, but his hands still held the bellows, w

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