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The Complete Fiction von Lovecraft, H. P. (eBook)

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The Complete Fiction

The Nameless City The Festival The Colour Out of Space The Call of Cthulhu The Dunwich Horror The Whisperer in Darkness The Dreams in the Witch House The Haunter of the Dark The Shadow Over Innsmouth Discarded Draft of 'The Shadow Over Innsmouth' The Shadow Out of Time At the Mountains of Madness The Case of Charles Dexter Ward Azathoth Beyond the Wall of Sleep Celephaïs Cool Air Dagon Ex Oblivione Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family From Beyond He Herbert West-Reanimator Hypnos In the Vault Memory Nyarlathotep Pickman's Model The Book The Cats of Ulthar The Descendant The Doom That Came to Sarnath The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath The Evil Clergyman The Horror at Red Hook The Hound The Lurking Fear The Moon-Bog The Music of Erich Zann The Other Gods The Outsider The Picture in the House The Quest of Iranon The Rats in the Walls The Shunned House The Silver Key The Statement of Randolph Carter The Strange High House in the Mist The Street The Temple The Terrible Old Man The Thing on the Doorstep The Tomb The Transition of Juan Romero The Tree The Unnamable The White Ship What the Moon Brings Polaris The Very Old Folk Ibid Old Bugs Sweet Ermengarde, or, The Heart of a Country Girl A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson The History of the Necronomicon

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: AdobeDRM
    Seitenzahl: 178
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9782291002154
    Verlag: e-fellows.net
    Größe: 1751 kBytes
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The Complete Fiction

W hen I drew nigh the nameless city I knew it was accursed. I was travelling in a parched and terrible valley under the moon, and afar I saw it protruding uncannily above the sands as parts of a corpse may protrude from an ill-made grave. Fear spoke from the age-worn stones of this hoary survivor of the deluge, this great-grandmother of the eldest pyramid; and a viewless aura repelled me and bade me retreat from antique and sinister secrets that no man should see, and no man else had dared to see.

Remote in the desert of Araby lies the nameless city, crumbling and inarticulate, its low walls nearly hidden by the sands of uncounted ages. It must have been thus before the first stones of Memphis were laid, and while the bricks of Babylon were yet unbaked. There is no legend so old as to give it a name, or to recall that it was ever alive; but it is told of in whispers around campfires and muttered about by grandams in the tents of sheiks, so that all the tribes shun it without wholly knowing why. It was of this place that Abdul Alhazred the mad poet dreamed on the night before he sang his unexplained couplet:

"That is not dead which can eternal lie,
And with strange aeons even death may die."

I should have known that the Arabs had good reason for shunning the nameless city, the city told of in strange tales but seen by no living man, yet I defied them and went into the untrodden waste with my camel. I alone have seen it, and that is why no other face bears such hideous lines of fear as mine; why no other man shivers so horribly when the night-wind rattles the windows. When I came upon it in the ghastly stillness of unending sleep it looked at me, chilly from the rays of a cold moon amidst the desert's heat. And as I returned its look I forgot my triumph at finding it, and stopped still with my camel to wait for the dawn.

For hours I waited, till the east grew grey and the stars faded, and the grey turned to roseal light edged with gold. I heard a moaning and saw a storm of sand stirring among the antique stones though the sky was clear and the vast reaches of desert still. Then suddenly above the desert's far rim came the blazing edge of the sun, seen through the tiny sandstorm which was passing away, and in my fevered state I fancied that from some remote depth there came a crash of musical metal to hail the fiery disc as Memnon hails it from the banks of the Nile. My ears rang and my imagination seethed as I led my camel slowly across the sand to that unvocal stone place; that place too old for Egypt and Meroë to remember; that place which I alone of living men had seen.

In and out amongst the shapeless foundations of houses and places I wandered, finding never a carving or inscription to tell of these men, if men they were, who built this city and dwelt therein so long ago. The antiquity of the spot was unwholesome, and I longed to encounter some sign or device to prove that the city was indeed fashioned by mankind. There were certain proportions and dimensions in the ruins which I did not like. I had with me many tools, and dug much within the walls of the obliterated edifices; but progress was slow, and nothing significant was revealed. When night and the moon returned I felt a chill wind which brought new fear, so that I did not dare to remain in the city. And as I went outside the antique walls to sleep, a small sighing sandstorm gathered behind me, blowing over the grey stones though the moon was bright and most of the desert still.

I awakened just at dawn from a pageant of horrible dreams, my ears ringing as from some metallic peal. I saw the sun peering redly through the last gusts of a little sandstorm that hovered over the nameless city, and marked the quietness of the rest of the landscape. Once more I ventured within those brooding ruins that swelled beneath the sand like an ogre under a coverlet, and again dug vainly for relics of

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