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The Complete Works of Herman Melville (15 Complete Works of Herman Melville Including Moby Dick, Omoo, The Confidence-Man, The Piazza Tales, I and My Chimney, Redburn, Israel Potter, And More) von Melville, Herman (eBook)

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The Complete Works of Herman Melville (15 Complete Works of Herman Melville Including Moby Dick, Omoo, The Confidence-Man, The Piazza Tales, I and My Chimney, Redburn, Israel Potter, And More)

This ebook comprises the complete writings of Herman Melville. The collection is sorted chronologically by book publication. There are the usual inline tables of contents and links after each text/chapter to get back to the respective tables. The dates of first publication are noted. Typee: A Romance of the South Seas. (1846) Omoo: Adventures in the South Seas. (1847) Mardi: and A Voyage Thither. (1849) Redburn: His First Voyage. (1849) White-Jacket: or, The World in a Man-of-War. (1850) Moby-Dick: or, The Whale. (1851) Pierre: or, The Ambiguities. (1852) Israel Potter: His Fifty Years of Exile. (1855) The Piazza Tales (1856): The Piazza, Bartleby, Benito Cereno, The Lightning-Rod Man, The Encantadas; or, Enchanted Isles, The Bell-Tower The Confidence-Man: His Masquerade. (1857) Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War. (1866) Clarel: A Poem and Pilgrimage in the Holy Land. (1876) John Marr and Other Sailors with Some Sea Pieces. (1888) Timoleon and Other Ventures in Verse. (1891) The Apple-Tree Table, and Other Sketches (1922): The Apple-Tree Table, Jimmy Rose, I and my Chimney, The Paradise of Bachelors and The Tartarus of Maids, Cock-a-Doodle-Doo!, The Fiddler, Poor Man's Pudding and Rich Man's Crumbs, The Happy Failure, The 'Gees. Essays: Fragments from a Writing Desk No. 1 & 2, Etchings of a Whaling Cruise, Authentic Anecdotes of 'Old Zack,' Mr Parkman's Tour, Cooper's New Novel, A Thought on Book-Binding, Hawthorne and His Mosses. Uncollected Poems: Marquis de Grandvin at the Hostelry, Naples in the Time of Bomba, Immolated, Madam Mirror, The Wise Virgins to Madam Mirror, The New Ancient of Days, The Rusty Man, Thy Aim, Thy Aim?, The Old Shipmaster and his Crazy Barn, Camoens, Camoens in the Hospital, Montaigne and his Kitten, Falstaffs Lament over Prince Hal, Shadow at the Feast, Merry Ditty of the Sad Man, Honor, Fruit and Flower Painter, The Medallion, Time's Long Ago!, In the Hall of Marbles, Gold in the Mountain...

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: AdobeDRM
    Seitenzahl: 1284
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9782378989569
    Verlag: e-fellows.net
    Größe: 6068 kBytes
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The Complete Works of Herman Melville (15 Complete Works of Herman Melville Including Moby Dick, Omoo, The Confidence-Man, The Piazza Tales, I and My Chimney, Redburn, Israel Potter, And More)

Chapter XI.

midnight reflections-morning visitors-a warrior in costume-a savage æsculapius-practice of the healing art-body servant-a dwelling-house of the valley described-portraits of its inmates.

VARIOUS and conflicting were the thoughts which oppressed me during the silent hours that followed the events related in the preceding chapter. Toby, wearied with the fatigues of the day, slumbered heavily by my side; but the pain under which I was suffering effectually prevented my sleeping, and I remained distressingly alive to all the fearful circumstances of our present situation. Was it possible that, after all our vicissitudes, we were really in the terrible valley of Typee, and at the mercy of its inmates, a fierce and unrelenting tribe of savages? Typee or Happar? I shuddered when I reflected that there was no longer any room for doubt; and that, beyond all hope of escape, we were now placed in those very circumstances from the bare thought of which I had recoiled with such abhorrence but a few days before. What might not be our fearful destiny? To be sure, as yet we had been treated with no violence; nay, had been even kindly and hospitably entertained. But what dependence could be placed upon the fickle passions which sway the bosom of a savage? His inconstancy and treachery are proverbial. Might it not be that beneath these fair appearances the islanders covered some perfidious design, and that their friendly reception of us might only precede some horrible catastrophe? How strongly did these forebodings spring up in my mind as I lay restlessly upon a couch of mats surrounded by the dimly revealed forms of those whom I so greatly dreaded!

From the excitement of these fearful thoughts I sank towards morning into an uneasy slumber; and on awaking, with a start, in the midst of an appalling dream, looked up into the eager countenance of a number of the natives, who were bending over me.

It was broad day; and the house was nearly filled with young females, fancifully decorated with flowers, who gazed upon me as I rose with faces in which childish delight and curiosity were vividly portrayed. After waking Toby, they seated themselves round us on the mats, and gave full play to that prying inquisitiveness which time out of mind has been attributed to the adorable sex.

As these unsophisticated young creatures were attended by no jealous duennas, their proceedings were altogether informal, and void of artificial restraint. Long and minute was the investigation with which they honoured us, and so uproarious their mirth, that I felt infinitely sheepish; and Toby was immeasurably outraged at their familiarity.

These lively young ladies were at the same time wonderfully polite and humane; fanning aside the insects that occasionally lighted on our brows; presenting us with food; and compassionately regarding me in the midst of my afflictions. But in spite of all their blandishments, my feelings of propriety were exceedingly shocked, for I could but consider them as having overstepped the due limits of female decorum.

Having diverted themselves to their hearts' content, our young visitants now withdrew, and gave place to successive troops of the other sex, who continued flocking towards the house until near noon; by which time I have no doubt that the greater part of the inhabitants of the valley had bathed themselves in the light of our benignant countenances.

At last, when their numbers began to diminish, a superb-looking warrior stooped the towering plumes of his head-dress beneath the low portal, and entered the house. I saw at once that he was some distinguished personage, the natives regarding him with the utmost deference, and making room for him as he approached. His aspect was imposing. The splendid long drooping tail-feathers of the tropical bird, thickly interspersed with the gaudy plumage of the cock, were disposed in an immense upright semicircle upon his

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