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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe: Volume 2 von Poe, Edgar Allan (eBook)

  • Verlag: Krill Press
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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe: Volume 2

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) is one of America's greatest and most dark and mysterious writers. The circumstances surrounding his untimely death are still unknown, as is what made him tick. Part of the American Romantic Movement, Poe is best known for his tales of mystery and the macabre, and he was one of the first Americans to master the art of the short story. Long before Sherlock Holmes became famous, Poe invented the genre of detective fiction, and his works influenced literature around the world in genres as wide ranging as cosmology and cryptography. Poe and his work still appear throughout popular culture today, popping up in literature, music, films, and even on the gridiron; the NFL's Baltimore Ravens got their name from his most famous poem.
Poe's best known fiction was Gothic, which was extremely popular at the time. Poe was a master of the genre, but he also realized that it would help him live off his writing, which was his goal. As a result, his most common themes involved death and madness, including its signs and physical manifestations. The darkness of his work is considered by many to be a reaction to Transcendentalism, which Poe strongly disliked.

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: AdobeDRM
    Seitenzahl: 381
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9781518316838
    Verlag: Krill Press
    Größe: 1430 kBytes
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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe: Volume 2

THE THOUSAND-AND-SECOND TALE OF SCHEHERAZADE

..................
Truth is stranger than fiction.

OLD SAYING.

HAVING had occasion, lately, in the course of some Oriental investigations, to consult the Tellmenow Isitsoornot, a work which (like the Zohar of Simeon Jochaides) is scarcely known at all, even in Europe; and which has never been quoted, to my knowledge, by any American-if we except, perhaps, the author of the "Curiosities of American Literature";-having had occasion, I say, to turn over some pages of the first-mentioned very remarkable work, I was not a little astonished to discover that the literary world has hitherto been strangely in error respecting the fate of the vizier's daughter, Scheherazade, as that fate is depicted in the "Arabian Nights"; and that the denouement there given, if not altogether inaccurate, as far as it goes, is at least to blame in not having gone very much farther.

For full information on this interesting topic, I must refer the inquisitive reader to the "Isitsoornot" itself, but in the meantime, I shall be pardoned for giving a summary of what I there discovered.

It will be remembered, that, in the usual version of the tales, a certain monarch having good cause to be jealous of his queen, not only puts her to death, but makes a vow, by his beard and the prophet, to espouse each night the most beautiful maiden in his dominions, and the next morning to deliver her up to the executioner.

Having fulfilled this vow for many years to the letter, and with a religious punctuality and method that conferred great credit upon him as a man of devout feeling and excellent sense, he was interrupted one afternoon (no doubt at his prayers) by a visit from his grand vizier, to whose daughter, it appears, there had occurred an idea.

Her name was Scheherazade, and her idea was, that she would either redeem the land from the depopulating tax upon its beauty, or perish, after the approved fashion of all heroines, in the attempt.

Accordingly, and although we do not find it to be leap-year (which makes the sacrifice more meritorious), she deputes her father, the grand vizier, to make an offer to the king of her hand. This hand the king eagerly accepts-(he had intended to take it at all events, and had put off the matter from day to day, only through fear of the vizier),-but, in accepting it now, he gives all parties very distinctly to understand, that, grand vizier or no grand vizier, he has not the slightest design of giving up one iota of his vow or of his privileges. When, therefore, the fair Scheherazade insisted upon marrying the king, and did actually marry him despite her father's excellent advice not to do any thing of the kind-when she would and did marry him, I say, will I, nill I, it was with her beautiful black eyes as thoroughly open as the nature of the case would allow.

It seems, however, that this politic damsel (who had been reading Machiavelli, beyond doubt), had a very ingenious little plot in her mind. On the night of the wedding, she contrived, upon I forget what specious pretence, to have her sister occupy a couch sufficiently near that of the royal pair to admit of easy conversation from bed to bed; and, a little before cock-crowing, she took care to awaken the good monarch, her husband (who bore her none the worse will because he intended to wring her neck on the morrow),-she managed to awaken him, I say, (although on account of a capital conscience and an easy digestion, he slept well) by the profound interest of a story (about a rat and a black cat, I think) which she was narrating (all in an undertone, of course) to her sister. When the day broke, it so happened that this history was not altogether finished, and that Scheherazade, in the nature of things could not finish it just then, since it was high time for her to get up and be bowstrung-a thing very little more pleasant than hangin

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