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A Companion to the Anthropology of the Middle East von Altorki, Soraya (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 04.05.2015
  • Verlag: Wiley-Blackwell
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A Companion to the Anthropology of the Middle East

Notes on Contributors

Hussein Ali Agrama is associate professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Questioning Secularism: Islam, Sovereignty and Rule of Law in Modern Egypt (2012), published by the University of Chicago Press. His current research explores historical and contemporary relationships between Judaism and Islam in France.

Soraya Altorki is professor of anthropology in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the American University in Cairo, where she has been teaching since 1977, serving as department chair from 1989 to 1991, and as unit head of anthropology several times. Her major fields of interest include the family, gender studies, youth, and comparative religion. She received her PhD in anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley in 1973. Among her publications are the following books: Women in Saudi Arabia: Ideology and Behavior Among the Elite (Columbia University Press, 1986); Arab Women in the Field: Studying Your Own Society (co-edited with Camillia Fawzi El-Solh; Syracuse University Press, 1988); Arabian Oasis City: The Transformation of 'Unayzah (co-authored with Donald P. Cole; University of Texas Press, 1989); Bedouins, Settlers, and Holiday-Makers: Egypt's Changing Northwest Coast (co-authored with Donald P. Cole; The American University in Cairo Press, 1998); and Jiddah: Umm al-Rakha' wa al-Shiddah [Jiddah: Mother of Comfort and Hardship], (in Arabic; senior co-author with Abu Bakr Baqadir; Dar al-Shuruq, 2006). She is also the author of many scholarly journal articles and book chapters. Professor Altorki was a distinguished visiting professor at King Saud University (1982 and 1983-1984) and a visiting assistant professor at King Abdulaziz University (1974-1976). She has been a post-doctoral research fellow at Northwestern University (1973-1977), Harvard University (1973-1974), University of Pennsylvania (Spring 1984), University of California, Los Angeles (Spring and Summer 1992 and Summer 1993), Georgetown University (Spring and Summer 1995), and Columbia University (as Arcapita Visiting Professor of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies, Spring 2010). She has received numerous funding awards from the Ford Foundation (multiple times), Wenner-Gren Foundation, the Population Council in Cairo, and the American University in Cairo.

Kamran Asdar Ali is associate professor of anthropology and director of the South Asia Institute at the University of Texas, Austin. He is the author of Planning the Family in Egypt: New Bodies, New Selves (UT Press, 2002). He is the co-editor of Gendering Urban Space in the Middle East, South Asia and Africa (Palgrave, 2008) and Comparing Cities: Middle East and South Asia (Oxford, 2009). He has published several articles on the issues of health and gender in Egypt and on Pakistani politics and popular culture. His forthcoming book is called Communism in Pakistan: Politics and Class Activism 1947-1972 (I.B. Tauris).

Hakem Al-Rustom is assistant professor of anthropology and the director of the graduate program in sociology and anthropology at the American University in Cairo. He earned his PhD from the London School of Economics for a thesis entitled "Anatolian Fragments: Armenians between Turkey and France." His research interests lie in the intersection between political anthropology and history, ethnographic silences, political emotions, and settler colonialism. His research provides alternative approaches to the study of Middle Eastern and post-Ottoman societies, and interrogates the politics of "minorities"/"majorities" in governing population diversity, legally ambiguous populations, and sectarianism in everyday life with reference to Armenians, Arab Jews, Christians in the Middle East, and Muslims in Europe. Before joining the American University in Cairo, Hakem was

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    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: AdobeDRM
    Seitenzahl: 568
    Erscheinungsdatum: 04.05.2015
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9781118475652
    Verlag: Wiley-Blackwell
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A Companion to the Anthropology of the Middle East

Notes on Contributors

Hussein Ali Agrama is associate professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Questioning Secularism: Islam, Sovereignty and Rule of Law in Modern Egypt (2012), published by the University of Chicago Press. His current research explores historical and contemporary relationships between Judaism and Islam in France.

Soraya Altorki is professor of anthropology in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the American University in Cairo, where she has been teaching since 1977, serving as department chair from 1989 to 1991, and as unit head of anthropology several times. Her major fields of interest include the family, gender studies, youth, and comparative religion. She received her PhD in anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley in 1973. Among her publications are the following books: Women in Saudi Arabia: Ideology and Behavior Among the Elite (Columbia University Press, 1986); Arab Women in the Field: Studying Your Own Society (co-edited with Camillia Fawzi El-Solh; Syracuse University Press, 1988); Arabian Oasis City: The Transformation of 'Unayzah (co-authored with Donald P. Cole; University of Texas Press, 1989); Bedouins, Settlers, and Holiday-Makers: Egypt's Changing Northwest Coast (co-authored with Donald P. Cole; The American University in Cairo Press, 1998); and Jiddah: Umm al-Rakha' wa al-Shiddah [Jiddah: Mother of Comfort and Hardship], (in Arabic; senior co-author with Abu Bakr Baqadir; Dar al-Shuruq, 2006). She is also the author of many scholarly journal articles and book chapters. Professor Altorki was a distinguished visiting professor at King Saud University (1982 and 1983-1984) and a visiting assistant professor at King Abdulaziz University (1974-1976). She has been a post-doctoral research fellow at Northwestern University (1973-1977), Harvard University (1973-1974), University of Pennsylvania (Spring 1984), University of California, Los Angeles (Spring and Summer 1992 and Summer 1993), Georgetown University (Spring and Summer 1995), and Columbia University (as Arcapita Visiting Professor of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies, Spring 2010). She has received numerous funding awards from the Ford Foundation (multiple times), Wenner-Gren Foundation, the Population Council in Cairo, and the American University in Cairo.

Kamran Asdar Ali is associate professor of anthropology and director of the South Asia Institute at the University of Texas, Austin. He is the author of Planning the Family in Egypt: New Bodies, New Selves (UT Press, 2002). He is the co-editor of Gendering Urban Space in the Middle East, South Asia and Africa (Palgrave, 2008) and Comparing Cities: Middle East and South Asia (Oxford, 2009). He has published several articles on the issues of health and gender in Egypt and on Pakistani politics and popular culture. His forthcoming book is called Communism in Pakistan: Politics and Class Activism 1947-1972 (I.B. Tauris).

Hakem Al-Rustom is assistant professor of anthropology and the director of the graduate program in sociology and anthropology at the American University in Cairo. He earned his PhD from the London School of Economics for a thesis entitled "Anatolian Fragments: Armenians between Turkey and France." His research interests lie in the intersection between political anthropology and history, ethnographic silences, political emotions, and settler colonialism. His research provides alternative approaches to the study of Middle Eastern and post-Ottoman societies, and interrogates the politics of "minorities"/"majorities" in governing population diversity, legally ambiguous populations, and sectarianism in everyday life with reference to Armenians, Arab Jews, Christians in the Middle East, and Muslims in Europe. Before joining the American University in Cairo, Hakem was

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