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Conservation Psychology Understanding and Promoting Human Care for Nature von Clayton, Susan (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 29.06.2015
  • Verlag: Wiley-Blackwell
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Conservation Psychology

People are inseparable from natural ecosystems, and understanding how people think about, experience, and interact with nature is crucial for promoting environmental sustainability as well as human well-being.

This is the new edition of what is now the leading textbook in conservation psychology, the field that explores connections between the study of human behavior and the achievement of conservation goals. Completely
updated, this book summarizes theory and research on ways in which humans experience nature; it explores people's conceptions of nature and environmental problems, their relationship with nature, and their moral lenses on nature; and examines ways to encourage conservation-oriented behavior at both individual and societal levels. Throughout, the authors integrate a wide body of research demonstrating the role of psychology in promoting a more sustainable relationship between humans and nature.

New sections cover human perceptions of environmental problems, new examples of community-based conservation, and a 'positive psychology' perspective that emphasizes the relevance of nature to human resilience. Additional references are to be found throughout this edition along with some new examples and a reorganisation of chapters in response to reader feedback.

This fascinating volume is used for teaching classes to senior undergraduate and graduate students of Conservation Psychology, Environmental Psychology and Conservation Science in departments of Psychology, Geography, Environmental Science, and Ecology and Evolution. It is equally suitable as a starting point for other researchers and practitioners - psychologists, conservation biologists, environmental scientists, and policy-makers - needing to know more about how psychological research can inform their conservation work.

Susan Clayton is Whitmore-Williams Professor of Psychology and Chair of Environmental Studies at the College of Wooster in Ohio, USA. She has served as president of the Society for Environmental, Population, and
Conservation Psychology and is president-elect of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. Her research focuses on understanding and promoting concern about environmental issues. In particular, Clayton is interested in the ways in which a relationship with nature is promoted through social interactions, and has studied these interactions in zoo settings around the world.

Gene Myers is a Professor at Huxley College of the Environment at Western Washington University, where he offers courses in conservation psychology, environmental history and ethics, and teaches and advises in undergraduate and graduate programs in environmental education. He is a past president of the Society for Human Ecology. His research interests include the psychological foundations of children's relation to animals; the
ontogenetic development of environmental care and responsibility; the integration of positive psychology into conservation and sustainability practice; and the teaching of environmental ethics and the preparation of future environmental educators.
People are inseparable from natural ecosystems, and understanding how people think about, experience, and interact with nature is crucial for promoting environmental sustainability as well as human well-being.

This is the new edition of what is now the leading textbook in conservation psychology, the field that explores connections between the study of human behavior and the achievement of conservation goals. Completely
updated, this book summarizes theory and research on ways in which humans experience nature; it explores people's conceptions of nature and environmental problems, their relationship with nature, and their moral lenses on nature; and examines ways to encourage conservation-oriented behavior at both individual and societal levels. Throughout, the authors integrate a wide body of research demonstrating the role of psychology in promoting a more sustainable relationship between humans and nature.

New sections cover human perceptions of environmental problems, new examples of community-based conservation, and a 'positive psychology' perspective that emphasizes the relevance of nature to human resilience. Additional references are to be found throughout this edition along with some new examples and a reorganisation of chapters in response to reader feedback.

This fascinating volume is used for teaching classes to senior undergraduate and graduate students of Conservation Psychology, Environmental Psychology and Conservation Science in departments of Psychology, Geography, Environmental Science, and Ecology and Evolution. It is equally suitable as a starting point for other researchers and practitioners - psychologists, conservation biologists, environmental scientists, and policy-makers - needing to know more about how psychological research can inform their conservation work.

Susan Clayton is Whitmore-Williams Professor of Psychology and Chair of Environmental Studies at the College of Wooster in Ohio, USA. She has served as president of the Society for Environmental, Population, and
Conservation Psychology and is president-elect of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. Her research focuses on understanding and promoting concern about environmental issues. In particular, Clayton is interested in the ways in which a relationship with nature is promoted through social interactions, and has studied these interactions in zoo settings around the world.

Gene Myers is a Professor at Huxley College of the Environment at Western Washington University, where he offers courses in conservation psychology, environmental history and ethics, and teaches and advises in undergraduate and graduate programs in environmental education. He is a past president of the Society for Human Ecology. His research interests include the psychological foundations of children's relation to animals; the
ontogenetic development of environmental care and responsibility; the integration of positive psychology into conservation and sustainability practice; and the teaching of environmental ethics and the preparation of future environmental educators.

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: AdobeDRM
    Seitenzahl: 344
    Erscheinungsdatum: 29.06.2015
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9781118874646
    Verlag: Wiley-Blackwell
    Größe: 6320 kBytes
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Conservation Psychology

Chapter 1
Introducing the Field of Conservation Psychology

Conservation
Psychology
Human care for nature
The roots of conservation psychology
The utility of conservation psychology
The practice of conservation psychology
The organization of the book
Conclusion
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References

Humanity faces environmental challenges on every level from local to global. Human population growth and human activities are negatively affecting the ecological processes that support life as we know it, and the effect of these changes on human well-being will be profound. Recent quantitative assessments of the human impact on nature give a sobering picture; the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment found that that about 60% of the earth's ecosystem services are being used unsustainably. Using ecological footprint methodology, the Global Footprint Network (Global Footprint Network, 2013; has calculated that humanity's load on the biosphere is about 150% of earth's capacity, up from 70% in 1961. These trends result from individual behavior patterns as well as from the societal infrastructure constituted by our institutions, governance systems, and ways of interacting. At stake are two inextricably linked sets of values: concern for the present and future quality of human lives and care about the vitality of the biosphere and its other inhabitants.

We were drawn to write about conservation psychology not only by these uncompromising facts and future possibilities but also by a perception that our primary discipline, psychology, could do more to address these realities. This is clear across areas of conservation and natural resource research. We want to urgently ask: Are psychologists on those research teams? Are they prepared to intelligently deploy their skills in these new contexts (do they know their ecology and economics)? Are other social or natural science specialists ready to seek those skills (do they understand human motivations and biases)? A growing body of psychological research is relevant to conservation. Collectively, however, psychology is at best midway into effectively putting its resources at the disposal of individuals and groups working for a more healthy relation to our planet. We have yet to see a sea-change in the work of psychologists toward addressing sustainability. This book is for the reader with some interest in psychology, whether as a psychologist or just that of a normally curious and reflective human being, and concern about contemporary threats to environmental and social well-being posed by the way humans relate to ecological systems. Our goal is to describe the many ways in which psychology is relevant to environmental sustainability and vice-versa.
Conservation

We define conservation psychology as the use of psychological techniques and research to understand and promote a healthy relationship between humans and the natural environment. Let us unpack the book's title. "Conservation" should not be identified with turn-of-the-twentieth century resource conservation, with its strictly utilitarian focus. Instead, we associate "Conservation" with its rebirth in the 1980s, in which it was applied to a whole new set of ideas, including landscape and continent-wide ecosystem planning, and especially to Conservation Biology. That field was born of a sense of crisis and some within it openly avowed value-laden positions (Soulé, 1985). The same goes for conservation psychology: the goal is not only to understand the interdependence between humans and nature but also to promote a healthy and sustainable relationship.

What's in a name?

There is no consensus on what to call the k

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