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Applied Cryptography, Protocols, Algorithms and Source Code in C von Schneier, Bruce (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 25.05.2017
  • Verlag: Wiley
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Applied Cryptography,

From the world's most renowned security technologist, Bruce Schneier, this 20th Anniversary Edition is the most definitive reference on cryptography ever published and is the seminal work on cryptography. Cryptographic techniques have applications far beyond the obvious uses of encoding and decoding information. For developers who need to know about capabilities, such as digital signatures, that depend on cryptographic techniques, there's no better overview than Applied Cryptography , the definitive book on the subject. Bruce Schneier covers general classes of cryptographic protocols and then specific techniques, detailing the inner workings of real-world cryptographic algorithms including the Data Encryption Standard and RSA public-key cryptosystems. The book includes source-code listings and extensive advice on the practical aspects of cryptography implementation, such as the importance of generating truly random numbers and of keeping keys secure. '. . .the best introduction to cryptography I've ever seen. . . .The book the National Security Agency wanted never to be published. . . .' -Wired Magazine '. . .monumental . . . fascinating . . . comprehensive . . . the definitive work on cryptography for computer programmers . . .' -Dr. Dobb's Journal '. . .easily ranks as one of the most authoritative in its field.' -PC Magazine The book details how programmers and electronic communications professionals can use cryptography-the technique of enciphering and deciphering messages-to maintain the privacy of computer data. It describes dozens of cryptography algorithms, gives practical advice on how to implement them into cryptographic software, and shows how they can be used to solve security problems. The book shows programmers who design computer applications, networks, and storage systems how they can build security into their software and systems. With a new Introduction by the author, this premium edition will be a keepsake for all those committed to computer and cyber security. Bruce Schneier is an internationally renowned security technologist, called a 'security guru' by The Economist . He is the author of twelve books-including his seminal work, Applied Cryptography: Protocols, Algorithms, and Source Code in C , and Secrets & Lies: Digital Security in a Networked World as well as hundreds of articles, essays, and academic papers. His influential newsletter 'Crypto-Gram' and blog 'Schneier on Security' are read by over 250,000 people. Schneier is a fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School, a program fellow at the New America Foundation's Open Technology Institute, a board member of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and an Advisory Board member of the Electronic Privacy Information Center. He is also the Chief Technology Officer of Resilient Systems, Inc. You can read his blog, essays, andacademic papers at www.schneier.com. He tweets at @schneierblog.

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: AdobeDRM
    Seitenzahl: 784
    Erscheinungsdatum: 25.05.2017
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9781119439028
    Verlag: Wiley
    Größe: 21902 kBytes
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Applied Cryptography,

Foreword
By Whitfield Diffie

The literature of cryptography has a curious history. Secrecy, of course, has always played a central role, but until the First World War, important developments appeared in print in a more or less timely fashion and the field moved forward in much the same way as other specialized disciplines. As late as 1918, one of the most influential cryptanalytic papers of the twentieth century, William F. Friedman's monograph The Index of Coincidence and Its Applications in Cryptography , appeared as a research report of the private Riverbank Laboratories [ 577 ]. And this, despite the fact that the work had been done as part of the war effort. In the same year Edward H. Hebern of Oakland, California filed the first patent for a rotor machine [ 710 ], the device destined to be a mainstay of military cryptography for nearly 50 years.

After the First World War, however, things began to change. U.S. Army and Navy organizations, working entirely in secret, began to make fundamental advances in cryptography. During the thirties and forties a few basic papers did appear in the open literature and several treatises on the subject were published, but the latter were farther and farther behind the state of the art. By the end of the war the transition was complete. With one notable exception, the public literature had died. That exception was Claude Shannon's paper "The Communication Theory of Secrecy Systems," which appeared in the Bell System Technical Journal in 1949 [ 1432 ]. It was similar to Friedman's 1918 paper, in that it grew out of wartime work of Shannon's. After the Second World War ended it was declassified, possibly by mistake.

From 1949 until 1967 the cryptographic literature was barren. In that year a different sort of contribution appeared: David Kahn's history, The Codebreakers [ 794 ]. It didn't contain any new technical ideas, but it did contain a remarkably complete history of what had gone before, including mention of some things that the government still considered secret. The significance of The Codebreakers lay not just in its remarkable scope, but also in the fact that it enjoyed good sales and made tens of thousands of people, who had never given the matter a moment's thought, aware of cryptography. A trickle of new cryptographic papers began to be written.

At about the same time, Horst Feistel, who had earlier worked on identification friend or foe devices for the Air Force, took his lifelong passion for cryptography to the IBM Watson Laboratory in Yorktown Heights, New York. There, he began development of what was to become the U.S. Data Encryption Standard; by the early 1970s several technical reports on this subject by Feistel and his colleagues had been made public by IBM [ 1482 , 1484 , 552 ].

This was the situation when I entered the field in late 1972. The cryptographic literature wasn't abundant, but what there was included some very shiny nuggets.

Cryptology presents a difficulty not found in normal academic disciplines: the need for the proper interaction of cryptography and cryptanalysis. This arises out of the fact that in the absence of real communications requirements, it is easy to propose a system that appears unbreakable. Many academic designs are so complex that the would-be cryptanalyst doesn't know where to start; exposing flaws in these designs is far harder than designing them in the first place. The result is that the competitive process, which is one strong motivation in academic research, cannot take hold.

When Martin Hellman and I proposed public-key cryptography in 1975 [ 496 ], one of the indirect aspects of our contribution was to introduce a problem that does not even appear easy to solve. Now an aspiring cryptosystem designer could produce something that would be recognized as clever-something that did more than just turn mea

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