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Manual of Temporomandibular Disorders von Wright, Edward F. (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 13.12.2013
  • Verlag: Wiley-Blackwell
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Manual of Temporomandibular Disorders

Manual of Temporomandibular Disorders, Third Edition, provides comprehensive, evidence-based information on temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Focusing on clinically relevant information throughout, the book allows dentists to diagnose TMD accurately, rule out disorders that mimic TMD, and provide effective therapy for most patients. Useful features, such as frequently asked questions, quick consults, technical tips, and focal points are integrated to help the clinician find precise answers with ease. Case scenarios provide the reader with a way to enhance their clinical reasoning skills, with a focus on solving TMD problems at chairside. Offering comprehensive coverage in a highly-illustrated, compact package, Manual of Temporomandibular Disorders is the ideal source for dentists dealing patients suffering from TMD. Edward F. Wright, DDS, MS, MAGD, is a professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center-San Antonio (UTHSCSA). He completed a one-year general dentistry residency and the University of Minnesota's two-year TMJ and Craniofacial Pain Fellowship. He taught TMD diagnosis and treatment to more than 100 U.S. Air Force residents in general dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and prosthodontics. Upon retiring from the Armed Forces, he completed a two-year research fellowship in TMD diagnosis and treatment at the South Texas Veterans Health Care System and taught TMD diagnosis and treatment to their general dentistry residents. He is now UTHSCSA's Course Director for their predoctoral dental students' TMD Course and Dental Anatomy and Occlusion Course, and teaches TMD to the school's general dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and prosthodontics residents. Dr. Wright is the primary author of more than 30 journal articles.

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: AdobeDRM
    Seitenzahl: 464
    Erscheinungsdatum: 13.12.2013
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9781118816820
    Verlag: Wiley-Blackwell
    Größe: 11378 kBytes
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Manual of Temporomandibular Disorders

Introduction

The cardinal signs and symptoms for temporomandibular disorder (TMD) are pain in the masseter muscle, temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and/or temporalis muscle regions; mouth-opening limitation; and TMJ sounds. TMD pain is by far the most common reason patients seek treatment.1,2
Focal Point The cardinal signs and symptoms for TMD are pain in the masseter muscle, TMJ, and/or temporalis muscle regions; mouth-opening limitation; and TMJ sounds.
TMD is the second most common musculoskeletal pain, with low back pain being the first. It is most often reported in individuals between the ages of 20 and 40. Approximately 33% of the population has at least one TMD symptom, and 3.6–7% of the population has TMD with sufficient severity to cause patients to seek treatment.2–5
Focal Point TMD is an extremely common disorder that is most often reported in individuals between the ages of 20 and 40. Approximately 33% of the population has at least one TMD symptom, and 3.6–7% has TMD with sufficient severity that treatment is desired.
TMD symptoms generally fluctuate over time and correlate significantly with masticatory muscle tension, tooth clenching, grinding, and other oral parafunctional habits . TMD symptoms are also significantly correlated with an increase in psychosocial factors, for example, worry, stress, irritation, frustration, and depression.6–8 Furthermore, TMD patients with poor psychosocial adaptation have significantly greater symptom improvement when the dentist's TMD therapy is combined with cognitive-behavioral intervention.2,9
Quick Consult Observing TMD Symptom Correlations
T MD symptoms generally fluctuate over time and correlate significantly with masticatory muscle tension, tooth clenching, grinding, and other oral parafunctional habits. TMD symptoms are also significantly correlated with an increase in psychosocial factors, for example, worry, stress, irritation, frustration, and depression.

TMD can cause other symptoms that are beyond the masticatory musculoskeletal system, for example, tooth pain, nonotologic otalgia (ear pain that is not caused by the ear), dizziness, tinnitus, and neck pain. TMD can contribute to migraine and tension headaches, muscle pain in the region, and many other pain complaints.10

Women request treatment more often than do men, providing a female–male patient ratio between 3:1 and 9:1.2 Additionally, TMD symptoms are less likely to resolve for women than for men.6,7 Many hypotheses attempt to account for the gender difference, but the underlying reason remains unclear.11
Quick Consult Comparing the Response of Men and Women
T MD symptoms are less likely to resolve for women than for men.

Knowledge about TMD has grown throughout the ages. In general, treatment philosophies have moved from a mechanistic dental approach to a biopsychosocial medical model with the integration of neuroscience literature. This is comparable to the treatment philosophies of other joint and muscle conditions in the body.3,12,13

Beneficial occlusal appliance therapy and TMJ disc-recapturing surgery were reported as early as the 1800s.12,14 The understanding of the importance to harmonize the occlusion for the health of the masticatory muscles and TMJs developed as the skills to reconstruct natural teeth advanced. As enthusiasm grew for obtaining optimum health, comfort, and function, the popularity of equilibrating the natural dentition also developed.12,15

In the 1930s, Dr. James Costen, an otolaryngologist, brought TMD into the awareness of physicians and dentists, and readers may still find TMD occasionally referred to as Costen's syndrome . Dr. Costen reported that TMD pain and secondary otologic symp

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