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Republic von Plato (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 07.04.2015
  • Verlag: eKitap Projesi
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Republic

The Republic (Greek: Politeia) is a Socratic dialogue, written by Plato around 380 BC, concerning the definition of (justice), the order and character of the just city-state and the just man, reason by which ancient readers used the name On Justice as an alternative title (not to be confused with the spurious dialogue also titled On Justice). The dramatic date of the dialogue has been much debated and though it must take place some time during the Peloponnesian War, 'there would be jarring anachronisms if any of the candidate specific dates between 432 and 404 were assigned'. It is Plato's best-known work and has proven to be one of the most intellectually and historically influential works of philosophy and political theory. In it, Socrates along with various Athenians and foreigners discuss the meaning of justice and examine whether or not the just man is happier than the unjust man by considering a series of different cities coming into existence 'in speech', culminating in a city (Kallipolis) ruled by philosopher-kings; and by examining the nature of existing regimes. The participants also discuss the theory of forms, the immortality of the soul, and the roles of the philosopher and of poetry in society. Short Summary (Epilogue): X.1-X.8. 595a-608b. Rejection of Mimetic Art X.9-X.11. 608c-612a. Immortality of the Soul X.12. 612a-613e. Rewards of Justice in Life X.13-X.16. 613e-621d. Judgment of the Dead The paradigm of the city - the idea of the Good, the Agathon - has manifold historical embodiments, undertaken by those who have seen the Agathon, and are ordered via the vision. The centre piece of the Republic, Part II, nos. 2-3, discusses the rule of the philosopher, and the vision of the Agathon with the allegory of the cave, which is clarified in the theory of forms. The centre piece is preceded and followed by the discussion of the means that will secure a well-ordered polis (City). Part II, no. 1, concerns marriage, the community of people and goods for the Guardians, and the restraints on warfare among the Hellenes. It describes a partially communistic polis. Part II, no. 4, deals with the philosophical education of the rulers who will preserve the order and character of the city-state. In Part II, the Embodiment of the Idea, is preceded by the establishment of the economic and social orders of a polis (Part I), followed by an analysis (Part III) of the decline the order must traverse. The three parts compose the main body of the dialogues, with their discussions of the 'paradigm', its embodiment, its genesis, and its decline. The Introduction and the Conclusion are the frame for the body of the Republic. The discussion of right order is occasioned by the questions: 'Is Justice better than Injustice?' and 'Will an Unjust man fare better than a Just man?' The introductory question is balanced by the concluding answer: 'Justice is preferable to Injustice'. In turn, the foregoing are framed with the Prologue (Book I) and the Epilogue (Book X). The prologue is a short dialogue about the common public doxai (opinions) about 'Justice'. Based upon faith, and not reason, the Epilogue describes the new arts and the immortality of the soul. About Author: Plato (Greek: Platon, ' 428/427 or 424/423 BC - 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece. He was also a mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his most-famous student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of Western philosophy and science. Alfred North Whitehead once noted: 'the safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato.' Plato's sophistication as a writer is evident in his Socratic dialogues; thirty-six dialogues and thirteen letters have been ascribed to him, although 15-18 of

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: none
    Seitenzahl: 476
    Erscheinungsdatum: 07.04.2015
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9786155564574
    Verlag: eKitap Projesi
    Größe: 3896 kBytes
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