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Naughty Girls and Gay Male Romance/Porn: Slash Fiction, Boys' Love Manga, and Other Works by Female 'Cross-Voyeurs' in the U.S. Academic Discourses von Bauer, Carola Katharina (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 01.06.2013
  • Verlag: Anchor Academic Publishing
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Naughty Girls and Gay Male Romance/Porn: Slash Fiction, Boys' Love Manga, and Other Works by Female 'Cross-Voyeurs' in the U.S. Academic Discourses

Despite the fact that there actually exists a large number of pornographic and romantic texts about male homosexuality consumed and produced by American women since the 1970s, the 'abnormality' of those female cross-voyeurs is constantly underlined in U.S. popular and academic culture. As the astonished, public reactions in the face of a largely female (heterosexual) audience of 'Brokeback Mountain' (2005) and 'Queer as Folk' (2000-2005) have shown, a woman's erotic/romantic interest in male homosexuality is definitely not as accepted as its male counterpart (men consuming lesbian porn). In the academic publications on female cross-voyeurs, the application of double standards with regard to male/female cross-voyeurism is even more obvious. As Karen Hellekson and Kristina Busse note in their 'Introduction' to 'Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Internet' (2006), slash fiction - fan fiction about male homosexual relationships mainly produced and consumed by women - has stood in the center of fan fiction studies so far, despite being merely a subgenre of it. The reason for this seems to be an urge to explain the underlying motivations for the fascination of women with m/m romance or pornography within the academic discourse - a trend which differs completely from the extremely under-theorized complex of men interested in 'lesbians.' It is this obvious influence of conventional gender stereotypes on the perception of these phenomena that provokes me to examine the way in which the works of female cross-voyeurism and their consumers/producers are conceptualized in the U.S. scholarly accounts. In many ways, this thesis explores unknown territories and respectively tries to take a closer look at academic problems that have not been adequately addressed yet.

Carola Bauer (M.A.) studied 'Europäische Kulturgeschichte' at the University of Augsburg and 'Literatur im kulturellen Kontext' at the University of Bayreuth. Presently, she lives in Ludwigsburg.

Produktinformationen

    Format: PDF
    Kopierschutz: none
    Seitenzahl: 131
    Erscheinungsdatum: 01.06.2013
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9783954895014
    Verlag: Anchor Academic Publishing
    Größe: 787kBytes
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Naughty Girls and Gay Male Romance/Porn: Slash Fiction, Boys' Love Manga, and Other Works by Female 'Cross-Voyeurs' in the U.S. Academic Discourses

Text Sample: Chapter 3, 'Cross-Writing' Female Novelists under Scrutiny: Mary Renault & Others in the U.S. Academic Discourses (1969 - Today): 3.1, Gay Male Fiction by Women - An Inventory: 'Much of the literature that has been discussed in connection with homosexuality has not been written by writers who would identify themselves as gay.' (Stephens 2). Thus, Hugh Stephens discusses the definition of 'gay male literature' in the introduction to The Cambridge Companion to Gay and Lesbian Writing (2011), and simultaneously reveals one basic characteristic usually associated with this genre: the autobiographical component (Bergman 309). As Sneja Gunew mentions in Framing Marginality (1994) 'minority writing' in general is often 'characterized by offering the authority and authenticity of the marginal experience' (Gunew 53): Whereas Gunew makes this statement with feminist literature and ethnic minority writing in mind, the same can be said about gay and lesbian literature - something that becomes even more obvious when looking more closely at Stephens' 'Homosexuality and Literature: An Introduction.' One might deduce from the quotation cited above that Stephens wants to base his definition of 'gay literature' on the same-sex content alone in order to circumvent the 'autobiographical prerequisite.' But this impression is deceptive: Stephens just refers to the Foucauldian realization that the identification with 'homosexuality' is a modern phenomenon - meaning that writers of 'homoerotic' literature such as Shakespeare or Plato could definitely not be gay-identified - while still upholding the condition that an author of 'gay male literature' has to have personal experience with male same-sex desire (Stephens 3-5). That such a restriction of the 'gay canon' is problematic becomes particularly evident when noticing the - not to be underestimated - number of women involved in the writing of male homosexual fiction. In French literature, it is especially Marguerite Yourcenar that springs to mind: With her novella Alexis - a story about a man leaving his wife in order to live out his homosexual tendencies - she celebrated her first literary success in 1929. And this is not her only work about same-sex desire between men: In Memoirs of Hadrian (1951), which is written in the form of testamentary letters from the Roman emperor to his successor Marcus Aurelius, the love relationship between Hadrian and a Bithynian youth called Antinuous forms an important part of the novel (Griffin 221-222; Kiebuzinski 160-1). But Yourcenar is by no means an exception. In Anglophone literature, there are plenty of female novelists in the 20th century writing about gay men as well: Mary Renault constitutes an example of a British female author whose homoerotic novels were 'enormously popular with the general public' in England and the U.S. of the 1960s, 70s and 80s, even 'though they contained explicit and positive representations of same-sex love' (Bergman 311). Partly, this success might be attributed to something the gay liberationist scholar Roger Austen calls the 'historical remove' in his groundbreaking study about the American homosexual novel, Playing the Game (Austen 91). Set in the antique world, literary works such as The Last of the Wine (1956), describing Athenian pederasty, and The Persian Boy (1972) - a novel about the love between Alexander the Great and his Persian eunuch called Bagoas - may have been less problematic for 'middle-class novel readers' because of their historical and geographical distance to 'real' homosexuality in the U.S., which was still considered to be an illness by the American Psychiatric Association in the 1950s (Ritter and Terndrup 29; Austen 91-2). Whereas the number of historical novels about same-sex love by female novelists might be attributed to the importance of female writers as writers of historical fiction in the 20th century (Wallace 3-4), there are also many novels about 'modern' male homosexuality by

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